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Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Signature Chefs Gala of Washington, D.C. 2014

Wednesday, November 12, 2014
Time: 6:30 PM
Registration Time: 6:00 PM
The Ritz-Carlton, Washington, D.C. Hotel
1150 22nd Street, NW
Washington, DC 20037


Mark Lowham, Managing Partner of TTR Sotheby’s International, cordially invites you to the March of Dimes 18th Annual Signature Chefs Gala. Presented by Dixon Hughes Goodman, LLP and TTR Sotheby’s International Realty, Signature Chefs is one of D.C.’s premier social events highlighting the city’s culinary masters brought together for an elegant evening of wine, cocktails and dining. You or your company can join approximately 500 affluent society members and business professionals as they support our mission while enjoying over 40 of the area’s celebrated chefs, mixologists, bartenders and vintners (listed below). What could be sweeter? The evening will also include auctions with unique dining, entertainment, travel and leisure packages. All proceeds benefit the March of Dimes, raising awareness for its mission and vital revenue to help prevent birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality.

Participating Chefs: Mike Isabella, 2014 Honorary Chef, chef/owner of G, Graffiato, Kapnos and Kapnos Taverna; Chef Wes Morton, Art & Soul; Chef Geoff Tracy, Chef Geoff's, Chef Geoff's Downtown, Chef Geoff's Tysons Corner, LIA'S, and Chef Geoff's Rockville; Chef Victor Albisu, Del Campo; Chef Dean Gold, DINO's Grotto - In Shaw; Chef Michael Harr, Food Wine & Co.;           Chef Max Albano, Good Stuff Eatery; Chef Jamie Leeds, Hank's Oyster Bar, Chef Michael Abt, Le Diplomate; Chef Matthew Adler, Osteria MoriniRappahannock River Oysters; Chef Javier Romero, Taberna Del Alabardero; Chef  Lonnie Zoeller, Vinoteca; Chef Devin Bozkaya, Westend Bistro.

Participating Bartenders & Mixologists: Jo-Jo Valenzuela, DC Craft Bartenders Guild; Jamie MacBain, Bourbon Steak; Ben Wiley, Cafe St. Ex; Christine Kim, Tico; Paul Taylor, Rhodeside Grill; Aaron Joseph, Wit and Wisdom; Glendon Hartley, Cava Mezze; Rico Wisner, Graffiato


For sponsorship opportunities, please contact Elizabeth Thomas at (571) 257-2300.

Monday, September 29, 2014

Keeping your child’s eyes safe


Did you know that August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety month? According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, “nine out of ten eye injuries are preventable, and almost half occur around the home.” Here are some safety guidelines from AAP to help prevent eye injuries:
• Make sure that any chemicals, such as detergents and cleaning fluids, are kept out of reach of children.
• Take a look at your children’s toys and watch out for sharp parts, especially for very young children.
• Teach your children how to hold scissors and pencils properly when they are young. That way as they get older, they will maintain these good habits.
• Looking directly into the sun can cause severe eye damage. And make sure that they never look directly at an eclipse of the sun.
• If you are working around the house with tools, either your child should not be in the area, or she should wear safety goggles.
• Keep your child away from power lawn mowers. These can launch rocks or other objects, making them dangerous projectiles.
• If your child is playing sports, make sure she is wearing eye protection that is appropriate for the sport.
• Children should be kept far away if you are lighting fires. And your child should NEVER be near fireworks of any kind.

Typically if dust or other small particles get in the eye, tears will actually clean the eye and wash them out. However, if a more serious eye injury occurs, make sure you call your pediatrician or go to the emergency room right away. For more information, you can read our previous post about healthy eye care for your baby and child.

If you have questions, feel free to email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.

Click here to read more News Moms Need blog posts on: pregnancy, pre-pregnancy, infant and child care, help for your child with delays or disabilities, and other hot topics.

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Breastfeeding your baby in the NICU can be challenging


Most babies, even those born very premature can learn to breastfeed. Breast milk provides many health benefits for all newborns, but especially for premature or sick babies in the NICU. Feeding a preemie may be much different than what you had planned. If you must pump, you may feel disappointed that you are not able to feed your warm baby on your breast. But, providing breast milk for your preemie is something special and beneficial that you can give him.
Here are tips to help you breastfeed your preemie while in the NICU.
If your baby is unable to feed or latch:
• Start pumping as soon as you can to establish your milk supply. Ask a nurse for a pump and assistance.
• If your preemie is tube feeding, your baby’s nurse can show you how to give your baby his feedings.
• Pump frequently, every 2 to 2-1/2 hours around the clock for a couple of days and nights (or 8 to 12 times during the day, so you can catch some sleep at night).
• Practice skin to skin or kangaroo care if your nurse says it is ok. Both are beneficial, even if your baby is connected to machines and tubes.
If your baby is able to suckle:
• Ask to feed him in a quiet, darkened room, away from the beeping machines and bright lights.
• Many mothers find the cross cradle position very helpful for feedings. Start with kangaroo care. Then position the baby across your lap, turned in towards you, chest to chest. Use a pillow to bring him to the level of your breast if you need to.
• Preemies need many opportunities at the breast to develop feeding skills regardless of gestational age. This requires practice and patience.
• You may need increased support to breastfeed your preemie. Look for support from your nurses, the hospital’s lactation consultant, friends or family.
Not every tip will work for every mom. Try to find the feeding methods and solutions that work best for you and your preemie. More information on how to feed your baby in the NICU can be found here.
If you have questions about how to feed your baby, email us at AskUs@marchofdimes.org.
 

 

Monday, September 22, 2014

Vaccines and your baby

In the first 2 years of life, your baby gets several vaccines to protect her. Most parents dread watching their baby get these shots. But rest assured, vaccinations (also called immunizations) can be more painful for you than for her! She may be uncomfortable for a minute, but these important shots help protect her from some serious childhood diseases like polio, chickenpox, measles, mumps and the flu.

All children should be vaccinated for their own health and so they don’t spread infections to others. This schedule shows each vaccine your baby gets up to 6 years. It also shows how many doses she gets of each vaccine and when she gets them.

How do vaccines work?
Tiny organisms (like viruses and bacteria) can attack your body and cause infections that make you sick. When you get an infection, your body makes special disease-fighting substances called antibodies to fight the organism. In many cases, once your body has made antibodies against an organism, you become immune to the infection it causes. Immune means you are protected against getting an infection. If you’re immune to an infection, it means you can’t get the infection.

Vaccines usually contain a small amount or piece of the organism that causes an infection. The organisms used in vaccines are generally weakened or killed so they won’t make you sick. The vaccine causes your body to make antibodies against the organism. This allows you to become immune to an infection without getting sick first.

Some vaccines have a live but weakened organism. These are called live-virus vaccines. While live-virus vaccines are usually safe for most babies and adults, they’re not generally recommended for pregnant women.

All childhood vaccines are given in two or more doses. Your baby needs more than one dose because each one builds up her immunity to that particular disease. A second or third dose is needed to fully protect her. These doses work best if they’re spread out over time.

Are vaccines safe for my baby?
Vaccines are one of the best ways to avoid serious diseases caused by some viruses or bacteria. For vaccines to be most successful, everyone needs to get them.

Most babies don’t have side effects from vaccines. If they do, they usually aren’t serious. Some vaccines may cause a low fever, a rash or soreness at the spot where the shot was given. Although your baby may seem like he’s getting sick after a vaccination, these reactions are good signs that his immune system is working and learning to fight off infections.

Your baby should get vaccinations and boosters regularly, all the way through age 18. (Adults need vaccinations, too. You can read more about adult vaccinations before, during or after pregnancy, here.) If you have any questions about vaccinations, ask your baby’s health care provider for more information.


 

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Signature Chefs Auction 2014 - Central Maryland

Monday, November 03, 2014
Time: 6:00 PM
Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel
700 Aliceanna Street
Baltimore, MD 21202


We hope that you will be able to join us in our 15th year as we present the March of Dimes Signature Chefs Auction in Central Maryland. We are honored that Mr. John McCormick from McCormick & Co., Inc. will chair the event.   You will enjoy an evening of fine food, wine and auction items. You will be able to visit over 30 of the area’s celebrated chefs all in one evening. Since 2000, this event has raised over $1 Million for the March of Dimes.

The VIP Reception will begin at 5:00 pm, followed by the General Tasting and Auction at 6:00 pm.


Sponsorship opportunities are available by contacting Jen Tarr at (410) 752-8152.

Monday, September 15, 2014

September is Newborn Screening Awareness Month

September is Newborn Screening Awareness Month. All babies in the United States get newborn screening. These tests look for rare but serious and mostly treatable health disorders. Babies with these disorders often look healthy. But unless the condition is diagnosed and treated early, a baby can develop lasting physical problems or intellectual disabilities, or may even die.

How is newborn screening done?

Newborn screening is done in 3 ways:
1. Most newborn screening is done with a blood test. Your baby’s provider pricks your baby’s heel to get a few drops of blood. The blood is collected on a special paper and sent to a lab for testing. The lab then sends the results back to your baby’s health provider.
2. For the hearing screening, your provider places a tiny, soft speaker in your baby’s ear to check how your baby responds to sound.
3. For heart screening, a test called pulse oximetry is used. This test checks the amount of oxygen in your baby’s blood by using a sensor attached to his finger or foot. This test is used to screen babies for a heart condition called critical congenital heart disease (CCHD).

When is newborn screening done?
Your baby gets newborn screening before he leaves the hospital, when he’s 1 or 2 days old. Some states require that babies have newborn screening again about 2 weeks later.

If your baby is not born in a hospital, talk to your baby’s provider about getting newborn screening before he is 7 days old.

How many health conditions should your baby be screened for?
Each state decides which tests are required. The March of Dimes would like to see all babies in all states screened for at least 31 health conditions. Many of these health conditions can be treated if found early.

Today all states require newborn screening for at least 26 health conditions. The District of Columbia and 42 states screen for 29 of the 31 recommended conditions. Some states require screening for up to 50 or more. You can find out which conditions your state screen for here.


 

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

What you need to know about enterovirus D68

Recently children in a number of states have become very sick with a severe respiratory illness. The cause of these infections, in many cases, has been found to be enterovirus D68. Enteroviruses are actually quite common. They are typically seen in the summer and fall and usually peak in mid-September, right as kids are heading back to school.

Most of the time people who are infected with enteroviruses do not even get sick. Or they may have mild symptoms, similar to the common cold. However the strain of enterovirus that is currently making the rounds seems to be causing more severe respiratory illness. Children are being admitted to hospitals and some are even ending up in intensive care units (ICUs).

Anyone can become infected with enterovirus D68. However, infants, children, and teenagers are most often at-risk because they have not been exposed to the virus before and have not built up immunity yet. Also children with asthma or a history of wheezing can be very vulnerable.

There is no specific treatment for enterovirus D68. Doctors treat and manage the symptoms. Since this is a virus, antibiotics are not effective. There are also no vaccines available that can prevent the infection. The best thing to do is to protect yourself and others from getting the virus in the first place. There are three things that you can do to protect yourself and your family from enterovirus D68:
• Make sure you are washing your hands often with soap and water, especially after using the bathroom or changing diapers. Monitor young children while they are washing their hands.
• Avoid close contact with people who are sick. This includes kissing, hugging, and sharing utensils.
• Clean and disinfect frequently used surfaces that may be contaminated.

Colds and viruses are very common at this time of year. However, if your child has a cold and has difficulty breathing, begins wheezing, or her condition changes in any way, it is important to contact her health care provider right away. This is especially true for children with asthma and/or allergies.

 

Monday, September 8, 2014

Vaccinations before, during and after pregnancy

If you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, it is very important to make sure that you are up-to-date on all of your vaccinations. Vaccines help protect your body from infection. You pass this protection to your baby during pregnancy. This helps keep your baby safe during the first few months of life until he gets his own vaccinations.

Vaccinations also protect you from getting a serious disease that could affect future pregnancies. You probably got vaccinations as a child. But they don’t always protect you for your entire life. Or there may be new vaccinations that weren’t available when you were young. Over time, some childhood vaccinations stop working, so you may need what’s called a booster shot as an adult.

Before pregnancy

Here are some vaccines that are recommended before pregnancy:

• Flu. Get the flu shot once a year during the flu season (October through May). It protects you and your baby against both seasonal flu and H1N1, a kind of flu that spread around the world in 2009. If you come down with the flu during pregnancy, you’re more likely than other adults to have serious complications, such as pneumonia.

• HPV. This vaccine protects against the infection that causes genital warts. The infection also may lead to cervical cancer. The CDC recommends that women up to age 26 get the HPV vaccine.

• MMR. This vaccine protects you against the measles, mumps and rubella. Measles can be harmful to pregnant women and cause miscarriage.

• Tdap. This vaccine prevents pertussis (also called whooping cough). Pertussis is easily spread and very dangerous for a baby. If you’re thinking about getting pregnant, ask your provider about getting the Tdap vaccine.

• Varicella. Chickenpox is an infection that causes itchy skin, rash and fever. It’s easily spread and can cause birth defects if you get it during pregnancy. It’s also very dangerous to a baby. If you’re thinking about getting pregnant and you never had the chickenpox or the vaccine, tell your provider.

During pregnancy

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends two vaccinations during pregnancy:

1. Flu vaccine if you weren’t vaccinated before pregnancy

2. Tdap vaccine during each pregnancy at 27 to 36 weeks

Not all vaccinations are safe to get during pregnancy. Do not get these vaccines during pregnancy:

• BCG (tuberculosis)

• Memingococcal

• MMR

• Nasal spray flu vaccine (called LAIV). Pregnant women can get the flu shot, which is made with killed viruses.

• Typhoid

• Varicella

After pregnancy

If you didn’t get the Tdap vaccine before or during pregnancy, you can get it right after you give birth. Getting the Tdap vaccine soon after giving birth prevents you from getting pertussis and passing it on to your baby. This vaccine is also recommended for caregivers, close friends, and relatives who spend time with your baby. Your baby should get his first pertussis vaccine at 2 months old. Babies may not be fully protected until they’ve had three doses.

Here’s a link to a chart to help you know when you can get certain vaccinations if you need them. Talk to your health care provider about vaccinations you need before, during or after pregnancy.
Tags: Tdap vaccine, vaccination during pregnancy, vaccines

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Heroines of Washington 2014

Tuesday, November 18, 2014
Time: 6:00 PM
The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner
1700 Tysons Blvd.
McLean, VA 22102


Heroines of Washington is one of Washington’s most unique events, recognizing and honoring women in the DC Metro Area for their dedication to community service.  

Click link to: Nominate a Heroine

Click link to review nominations FAQ 
Formerly Heroines in Technology, in response to the growing demand from our community, the March of Dimes expanded this gala to honor women for their community service in various industries.  Since 2001, the March of Dimes has honored 80 “Heroines” and raised more than $1.7 million to ensure that one day all babies are born full term and healthy.  Guests include directors, CEOs and other high-level individuals from local corporations and government agencies. This black tie event includes a cocktail reception, dinner and a silent and live auction.

Awards will be presented for the following categories:
- Healthcare Heroine Award sponsored by General Dynamics Information Technology
- Professional Services Heroine Award sponsored by Middleburg Wealth Management
- Public Sector Heroine Award sponsored by Sapient
- Real Estate Heroine Award sponsored by Womble Carlyle
- Technology Heroine Award sponsored by MorganFranklin Consulting
- Rising Heroine Award 
- Lifetime Heroine Award

For more information about the event, a list of Former Heroines and sponsorship opportunities, please view the Heroines of Washington packet or contact Marissa Nihill at (571) 257-2305 or mnihill@marchofdimes.com. 

Monday, September 1, 2014

Preemies and hearing loss

Nearly 3 in 1,000 babies (about 12,000) are born with some kind of hearing loss in the United States each year. Most babies get their hearing checked as part of newborn screening before they leave the hospital. Newborn screening checks for serious but rare conditions at birth.

If your baby doesn’t pass his newborn hearing screening, it doesn’t always mean he has hearing loss. He may just need to be screened again. If your baby doesn’t pass a second time, it’s very important that he gets a full hearing test as soon as possible and before he’s 3 months old.

The risk of hearing loss is significantly higher in babies born with a very low birth weight (less than 1500 grams). However, hearing loss can be caused by other factors, such as genetics, family history, infections during pregnancy, infections in your baby after birth, injuries, medications or being around loud sounds. See our article  to learn more about the different causes of hearing loss.

Possible treatments

Different treatments are available depending on your child’s level of hearing loss, his health, and the cause of the hearing loss. They include medication, surgery, ear tubes, hearing aids, cochlear implants, learning American Sign Language and receiving speech therapy.  The article on our website discusses each of these types of treatments.

If a child needs speech therapy, it can usually be provided through the early intervention program for babies and toddlers. Read this post to understand how to access services. The sooner your child gets help, the sooner language skills will emerge and improve.

If you need more detailed information, check out these sites:




Note:  This post is part of the weekly series Delays and disabilities – how to get help for your child. It was started in January 2013 and appears every Wednesday. While on News Moms Need and click on “Help for your child” in the Categories menu on the right side to view all of the blog posts to date (just keep scrolling down). We welcome your comments and input.

 
Tags: deaf, early intervention, hearing aids, hearing loss, impairment, language, newborn screening, preemies, prematurity, speech, speech therapy, very low birth weight